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Childhood Matters: The Social, Emotional and Cultural Needs of Pre-Schoolers - August 21, 2005


Published August 21, 2005


As more and more children attend pre-school, childcare providers and parents need to keep the social, emotional, and cultural needs of young children in mind. Guests: Karen Blinstrub, Executive Director of Child, Family and Community Services, Inc., and Dr. Paula Moten-Tolson of Safe Passages and First 5 Contra Costa.


Date 2005-08-21 00:00:00


Reviews

Reviewer: flo123 - - October 10, 2005
Subject: The Social, Emotional and Cultural Needs of Pre-schoolers
This talk show is very informative. As an educator as well as a parent I agree that it is important that parents and teachers work together as a team. I think is imperative that teachers learn how to address the social, emotional and culture of each child in the classroom.
The quality of learning that young children experience is of crucial importance for both their future and that of their nation. In guiding young childrens learning and development, early childhood teachers must possess the knowledge, skills and sensitivity to interact successfully with not only the young child, but also parents, guardians, paraprofessionals, community organizations and others whose actions affect children. Moreover, they must accommodate the breadth of young childrens interests and needs in a diverse society.
Our school believes in educating the "whole child" by focusing on intellectual, social, emotional, physical and creative growth. This approach lends value to the rich diversity of culture that children bring to the classroom. Our philosophy is to provide a stimulating environment in which activities are planned to meet the need of each child at his or her own level and rate of development. Learning is spontaneous, children learn from each other and teachers act as facilitators in the learning process.
Reviewer: tmore - - October 9, 2005
Subject: The Social, Emotional and Cultural Needs of Pre-schoolers
I really liked the topic and the way both Rona and Dr. Moten-Tolson attacked the problem. I am also an educator and I agree with the advice you gave to the parent. Good advice was given to Michelle and she was also pleased and agreed to the answers. The problems that she had was frightening, but you both talked about making it a positive situation. Michelle was concerned about the other child's behaviors rubbing off on her son. The first thought is normal to feel like getting bad behaviors away by isolating the child. Our children cannot be isolated from the world and problems. Soon or later an issue is going to arise that you and the child has to face. I agree on bringing the other child over and letting the two share time togetther. Since Michelle's son loved the other child so much, it was a wise chioce to spend time and find out about the other child. Michelle should also take the advice of talking to the teacher. The teacher-parent relationship is a good beginning. I enjoyed the radio show. Thank you and Dr. Moten-Tolson. Tmoore
Reviewer: Pawmew - - September 9, 2005
Subject: In Response to The Social, Emotional and Cultural Needs of Pre-schoolers
As an educator as well as a parent I agree that it is important that the needs/concerns of the child be addressed as a whole-part. Also as a male/father I feel that it is imperative that fathers or some positive male role be involved in the lives of children.

I also think it is important for the social, emotional and cultural aspects of children be dealt with if children are to make progress overall. Also, I feel that it is important that educators, parents, brothers, sisters and all who have contact with these children receive training that address the social, emotional, and cultural needs.

I also agree with the panel that it is important to address all the needs of the child in questions. All children are different but think they all have the same basic needs however the degree of attention needed may vary.

I'll end by saying that their is a constant need for educating and re-educating children, parents, educators, and the public in general as it relates to serving the young of America.
Reviewer: Grace Nwosu - - September 9, 2005
Subject: Parent-School Community Collaboration
This is a very good talk show and very educational too. For collaboration to occur between parents and preschool communities, communication between the parent and school is very important. The talk show emphasized on the parents' and teacher's working closely together to establish good relationships and an open communication system through which the solution mode is established to alleviate parents' and teacher's fears and at the same time help children to learn in a conducive environment. This is the key to children's success in schools. Secondly, parents and teachers should realize that every child is unique and should not be compared with other children. Teachers should see themselves as partners with parents to encourage families to talk about ideas, cultures, expectations and experiences in the school to create a high quality educational environment for learning. Teachers should integrate diverse cultures into their teaching. The issue of men being involved in the education of young children is very, very important. We need to have male role models in our schools to care and nurture our young children. Parents and teachers have to provide a save and nurturing environment for children to learn. Teachers have to love, understand the culture differences we have, and communicate better with parents. Both parents and teachers should pay close attention to the young children's social, emotional and cultural needs, as it will enhance their ability to learn.
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